Posts tagged Healing
The Spirit of Restorative Justice

Sujatha Baliga found herself sitting in a room with a murderer and his victim’s parents, who had come seeking something more than punishment for their child’s killer. Sujatha, and the process of Restorative Justice, was uniquely positioned to help. In this interview, Sujatha teaches us about the practice of Restorative Justice and her personal experience.

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Moving Beyond Fear Together

Concern and anger overcame us when we heard that a mother and daughter had been punched in the face in the subway in Queens, New York. Seeing the Orthodox Jewish woman’s head covering, the assailant mistook the pair as Muslim, assaulted them and yelled “get out of my country.” The New York Daily News reports that hate crimes are up by 33% in New York and Muslims have seen a 48% increase in hate incidents since 2016. Nation-wide, the Anti Defamation League reports that “anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. jumped 86 percent in the first quarter of 2017 compared to same period last year.” With the rise in hateful sentiments toward both Muslim and Jewish communities and the lack of differentiation between both communities, it is clear that Muslims and Jews are seen as “the other, together.” Indeed, we know women of both faiths have chosen to no longer wear their head coverings in public. Some families choose not to display their religious attire in public spaces. 

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Into the Shadow

Jim sweeps off his hat scattering snow to the ground and uses it to fan the embers. This time flames rise up to consume the softwood kindling which flares enough to catch. Jim stands, and we hold the silence. Snow again accumulates on his hat and our eyes are captivated by the fire. All of us are men. 

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Why Empathy Is The Medicine The World Needs

Remember to check in with your heart. It will always tell you that the good is more powerful than any darkness, and that even in times of darkness, your belief in the good will ignite the light of others. One light becomes two, which become millions. It might take a little time, but have faith. With empathy, we have the power to change the world.

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Teaching With Tenderness: Toward An Embodied Practice

The following essay on historical memory as an embodied concept comes from a forthcoming book by Becky Thompson, Teaching with Tenderness: Toward an Embodied Practice. In the tradition of bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Thompson invites us to draw upon contemplative practices (yoga, meditation, free writing, mindfulness, ritual) to keep our hearts open as we reckon with multiple injustices.

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Revolution of the Heart: Gender healing as a path to the beloved

Verena’s words struck home like a dagger in the hearts of the others in the room. Verena is a Member of Parliament in South Africa, and she was sharing her personal story on the fourth day of a unique workshop entitled “Gender Equity and Reconciliation” for Members of Parliament and other South African leaders.

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American Shadow: Healing our wounds, facing our grief

The first step in shadow healing is acknowledging that there’s a real issue going on that we can’t control or fix by ourselves with our own wills. Whether it’s a personal crisis or a collective crisis, we first acknowledge the seriousness of the problem. In terms of the larger picture and the planet, we are in a global crisis.

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Inside the Dreaded Moment

“The doctor just biopsied the lymph nodes, and they are positive,” my twenty year-old daughter said, her voice eerily calm over the speaker phone. This gut punch came after months of swollen lymph nodes, odd symptoms, multiple doctors’ visits, and many emotional roller coasters. No matter how near I had lived to loss and to trauma, when it came to my only child, this news felt like the blow of all blows. 

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Trauma in the Body: Interview with Dr. Bessel van der Kolk

In this exclusive interview we explore new hopes for trauma healing with Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. He begins, "Neuroscience research has shown that the only way you can change your survival orientation in your brain is by accessing your interoceptive world—the part of your brain that allows you to observe yourself." 

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From Despair to Gratitude: How Yoga Transformed One Mother’s Life

Several years ago, I set out to interview people who had undergone major challenges in their lives. Biliana Angelova's presence didn’t suggest to me that she had any difficulties in life. But, of course, I should have known better. Over the course of interviewing people, I came to see—and expect—that the people who seem strongest and most centered are often the very people who have been challenged most profoundly.

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